Voter IDs, Blockchain, & Attorneys General?

How can a future Department of Technology, as proposed by Fuji For Congress, at the state, county, and local levels offer a technology-centric public benefit for all voters and genuine election integrity?

Why am I writing about Attorneys General and District Attorneys? Because a future Department of Technology, as I envision here, would serve in comparable roles alibi with a technology-centric mission to produce voter IDs integrated with blockchain, and work with Attorneys General and District Attorneys to prosecute election fraud that involves technology.

To expand more, involving an elected official at the municipal, county, and state levels for forthcoming Department of Technology agencies would provide a comparable purpose with a technology-centric focus. Election integrity is a justifiable concern for many American voters. However, I believe voter IDs combined with blockchain technology can produce a more efficient, cost-effective, inclusive, secure, and verifiable election process.

Mail-in-ballots are slow, inefficient, costly, and hurt the environment needlessly while prone to deliberate voter fraud. It’s time to encourage more in-person voting secured with common-sense voter identification and blockchain.

FUJI FOR CONGRESS

As we all know nowadays, technology is continually playing a more decisive, involved, and controversial role in our election processes; at all levels, such as local, county, state, and federal: voter tabulations, voter enrollment, and cybersecurity.

Analogous to how Attorneys General at the state level and District Attorneys at the county and local levels cooperate or challenge each other in courts to function as a check and balance for the rule of law, a forthcoming Department of Technology as I envisioned, would do the same in a laser-focus technology-centric regulatory and advisement capacity.

As mentioned before, various Attorneys General work collectively or confront each other in courts to check against the overreaching federal government mandates and laws. Likewise, involving elected officials at the county and state levels from my technology agency would provide a comparable purpose and mission with a technology-centric focus for a meaningful check and balance for our increasingly technology dependent elections.

Electronic voting technology has made great technological strides since its introduction in the 1960s, but most voters still consider it to be ‘untrustworthy’ or ‘unreliable’ to verify election results. Blockchain technology can reassure voter identities are private, secure, and verifiable through individual digital signatures without compromising ballot secrecy.

A printed state-government issued voter ID would be the first process for voter identification, the second part would be the blockchain technology. We would issue each voter a one of kind blockchain, just like a driver’s license has a unique driver license number.

Using blockchain technology will advance our efforts to increase voter participation while providing a more timely, secure, and accurate count of final-results. We all want improved accuracy, transparency, and accountability at every level of government, right? At least, we the voters and the taxpayers do!

In addition, by utilizing blockchain technologies for voting purposes, officials and voters alike will have an unprecedented ability to audit results beyond what voting technology could provide just ten years ago–full transparency into the vote count and improving upon current security measures against hacking attempts.

Blockchain technology is reliable and secure under similar real-world conditions of cyber-attacks. However, election authorities in many states cannot or will not provide the technological support for safe, efficient, fast, and fair elections.

Voters will have more faith that our electoral process was straightforward, honest, and calculated precisely by adopting a publicly auditable electronic blockchain voting process.

FUJI FOR CONGRESS

Let’s do an oversimplified refresher course on what our Attorneys General do and how it relates to a future Department of Technology.

Attorneys General in each state serves to enforce the rule of law in their respective states. In addition, as chief legal officers of the states, commonwealths, District of Columbia, and territories of the United States, the role of an attorney general is to serve as legal counsel to state government agencies and legislatures and as a representative of the public interest.  

An Attorney General in your state often works together or against each other Attorneys General from various states in the courtrooms; Such actions function as a check against overreaching mandates, laws, and expected legislation.

Here are some outlines of what our Attorneys General do in your state:

  • Issuing formal opinions to state agencies 
  • Acting as public advocates in areas such as child support enforcement, consumer protection, antitrust, and utility regulation 
  • Proposing legislation 
  • Enforcing federal and state environmental laws 
  • Representing the state and state agencies before the state and federal courts 
  • Handling criminal appeals and serious statewide criminal prosecutions 
  • Instituting civil suits on behalf of the state 
  • Representing the public’s interests in charitable trust and solicitations 
  • Operating victim compensation programs 

As a side note, the Attorneys General of Alaska, Delaware, and Rhode Island have the authority to prosecute any state criminal law violations within their state. More on this later in another article and how a future Department of Technology can prosecute election officials and others for election fraud! 

To reiterate, our District Attorneys at the county and municipal levels perform similar duties within their city, municipal, and county jurisdictions. Most District Attorneys are elected officials.

Therefore, having an elected official at the municipal, county, and state levels for future a Department of Technology agencies would serve a similar legal, regulatory, and enforcement purpose with a technology-centric focus.

I would name the public office title the Secretary of Technology, of the Department of Technology, at the state level, would be a four-year elected position, with two-term limits. As you might imagine already, our state’s Secretary of Technology would act in similar capacities as an Attorney General. 

For example:

  • Issuing formal opinions to state agencies on technology
  • Acting as public advocates in areas such as cybersecurity enforcement, online consumer protection, cryptocurrency, and utility security regulation 
  • Proposing technology-centric legislation, such as but not limited to prohibiting ALL elected officials, while in office, from receiving, inside the USA or outside, untraceable cryptocurrency. All elected officials who leave public office must report for ten years to IRS all cryptocurrency they derive benefit, influence, or acquire. (More on this in another article)
  • Enforcing federal and state technology laws 
  • Representing the state and state agencies before the state and federal courts in matters of technology
  • Instituting civil suits on behalf of the state 
  • Representing the public’s interests in technology matters
  • Operating victim compensation programs for online identity theft
  • Work with the state to design voter IDs with blockchain, issue, and safeguard election data. 

To review, a future Department of Technology can offer many public services that provide a genuine public benefit to you and me. 

However, one of the most important, desired, and much-needed public services is working with the state to design voter IDs integrated with blockchain, produce, and safeguard election data to assure voters our elections are legitimate, accountable, and transparent.

Election integrity is a legitimate concern for many American voters, regardless of political party preference. However, I believe a state government-issued voter ID paired and integrated with blockchain technology can ensure a more inclusive, secure, and verifiable election process. 

Our 2020 Presidential election failures, whether intentional or unintentional, have proven that the state government agencies of the Attorneys General and election authorities of many states do not have or do not want the technological expertise to ensure an inclusive, secure, and verifiable election process. To be sure, they do not want voters like you and me to have an easy-to-use access to our vote count verification. Why?

As a result, to this day, election authorities have refused to adequately answer the most simple, essential, and concerning technology questions. 

For example:

  • What type of modem was used in the machines? 
  • When and where was the modem manufactured? 
  • Why was there a modem in the voting machine in the first place? Were there voting machines reliant on Windows 2000 Professional in 2000? Yes, I said Windows 2000 Professional!
  • Were your voting machines certified to meet Federal Minimum Testing Standards?
  • Why is your Secretary of State the sole decider of what voting systems are certified?

To repeat, technology is constantly playing a critical and pervasive role in our elections at the local, county, state, and federal election levels: voter tabulations, voter registration, and cybersecurity, to name a few examples. 

Let us remember, Attorneys General at the state level and District Attorneys at the county and local levels collaborate or challenge each other in court to act as a check and balance for the rule of law, a future Department of Technology would do the same in a technology-centric capacity to assure election integrity.

Each publicly elected Department of Technology Director (municipal), Supervisor of Technology (county-wide), and Secretary of Technology (statewide), as proposed by me, would act as an independent check and balance to detect potential fraud, waste, and security breaches in our ever more technology-dependent election process. 

Do you trust your local or county election authority? Just as we have multiple Attorneys General and District Attorneys to act as a check and balance on one another; let’s do the same or our election. Is the regulatory compliance and enforcement between Attorneys General and District Attorneys concerning the renaming of a city street sign more important to our representative form of democracy than the integrity of your vote?

Therefore, we need a future Department of Technology as soon as possible that can provide the technology related support, regulatory, and enforcement, for secure and fair elections that employ government-issued voter identification paired with blockchain technologies. Without this, our representative form of democracy is at immediate risk, from domestic and foreign actors, organizations, and governments.

My proposed Department of Technology initiative will support state agencies for responsible election security and reasonable voter IDs laws. This will help ensure that our elections are inclusive, secure, and verifiable. In addition, both the county and statewide Department of Technology agency should have a dedicated division of election integrity for investigative purposes. Have you ever asked your county election authority if your voting machines meet federal approval for federal elections? How important is your vote to you when you vote for the congressperson of your choice?

Other specialized divisions within the agency would further include specialists in education, environment, cryptocurrency, transportation, small business development, and others, which will be explained in forthcoming articles.

For example, the Department of Technology at the county and local level would coordinate with their state and county Department of Transportation to deploy Artificial Intelligence and lidar sensors on traffic lights and crosswalks to improve safety efficacy and expedite SMART City initiatives. Ever been at a stoplight in your car at an intersection, and there was no oncoming traffic in either direction? Or the Department of Technology in your state would work with their sister Department of Technology agencies in other states to advise a multi-state plan for sharing Internet bandwidth in case of a natural disaster like earthquakes, hurricanes, solar flare, war, etc. For example, in an emergency, neighboring states of California, Arizona, and Nevada would prioritize the Internet bandwidth for like water, sewage, and electricity utilities, police, fire, hospitals, transportation, police, schools, etc. More on this that later in another article!

As pointed out beforehand, each publicly elected Department of Technology Director of Technology (municipal), Supervisor of Technology (county-wide), and Secretary of Technology (statewide) would perform as a separate regulatory check and balance to uncover potential fraud, graft, waste, and security infringements in our continually more technology-dependent election process.

As we all understand from the 2020 elections, elections are critical to our democracy, but the process is often insecure and can be manipulated with criminal intent to change the outcome of elections. Once again, security of our elections is under threat from hackers, foreign governments, and other bad actors. We need to make sure our elections are fair and secure.

Voter identification paired with blockchain technologies would be a meaningful start to a more secure, fair, and inclusive election. Furthermore, we can once and for all have a proficient, transparent, accountable, and cost-effective method to correct our voter rolls.

*By using voter ID paired with blockchain, voters can substantiate by themselves that their vote was received correctly but registered and cast accurately in the concluding tally. Fuji For Congress

A future Department of Technology, as I envisioned here, would serve as a focal point for election security and integrity. We would work with local officials to ensure our elections are fair and verifiable for all voters.

In addition, all mail-in paper ballots would have a unique QR code paired for that specified voter’s unique voter identification and blockchain to prevent fraudulent voting or over voting.

To be clear, in-person voting is always more secure than mail-in paper ballots. The QR technology has technology in place to help to meaningfully prevent voter fraud regarding mail-in paper ballots.

The blockchain technology could track each vote in real-time and immediately detect voter fraud in the voting process. This technology would also allow for an accurate email response system that allows voters to know when their ballot is received, opened, voted on, and counted. To ensure 100% security of the technology being used, all data will only be stored on government-owned servers at the state Department of Technology with 24 hour public Internet viewing access, instead of privately owned servers or any other type of cloud technology.

To reiterate, a future Department of Technology, as summarized here, would work with local, county, state, and federal lawmakers to draw up thoughtful voter laws with a public benefit.

The Department of Technology would help to look at the facts and recommend how U.S. voter data can be properly accessed, safeguarded, shared, or sold in a manner that is helpful for all involved parties- whether it’s voters themselves, states, federal government, technology companies, marketers & consumer research firms.

Such as but not restricted to advising lawmakers to immediately produce and pass state and federal laws to once and for all, detect, prohibit and prosecute to the fullest intensity of the law the premeditated, and calculated sharing and selling of American voter names, addresses, emails, telephone numbers, party preference, sex, and more to foreign companies, governments, and foreigners. Did you know that many election software apps and programs that use your personal voter data, used by American politicians, marketers, and lobbyists, are foreign owned and operated?

We need to use voter identification with blockchain technology, so there are no questions about voter intent or process issues because of technology records.

By using a printed government issued voter ID with photographs and with blockchain technology, we can accomplish:

  • Voters will have more confidence that our electoral process was fair, transparent, and counted accurately by using a publicly auditable electronic blockchain voting system.Detect and reduce voter fraud
  • Use blockchain to ensure voter privacy
  • Guarantee one vote per voter per candidate, measure, etc.
  • Provide a needed check against compromised or partisan election authorities
  • A way to keep federal government overreach in check
  • Update mail-in paper ballots with personalized QR codes verified with voter ID and unique blockchain to ensure one vote per voter per candidate, measure, etc.
  • Streamline, secure, and modernize voter registration.
  • Reassure citizens that America is still a land of laws and the Constitutional Republic.

In summary, having an elected official at the municipal, county, and state levels for future a Department of Technology agencies that would serve with a technology-centric focus in a regulatory and enforcement capacity would assure more American voters of a more inclusive, secure, and verifiable election process. 

I am Fuji Shioura, your America First Republican candidate for California’s 40th Congressional District, and I will always place America First by placing you, the American voter, first, and not career politicians, marketers, and lobbyists!

More information is coming soon!

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.